World in no better place to fight pandemics than before COVID – review – Reuters

Share Article

The World Health Organization logo is pictured at the entrance of the WHO building, in Geneva, Switzerland, December 20, 2021. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
LONDON, May 18 (Reuters) – The world is no better prepared for a new pandemic than it was when coronavirus emerged in 2019 and may actually be in a worse place given the economic toll, according to a panel set up by the World Health Organization (WHO) to evaluate the global response.
A lack of progress on reforms such as international health regulations means the world is as vulnerable as ever, the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response said in its report.
The authors, led by former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark and former president of Liberia Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, acknowledged some progress, including on more robust funding for the WHO, but said the process was going far too slowly.
"We have right now the very same tools and the same system that existed in December 2019 to respond to a pandemic threat. And those tools just weren't good enough," Clark told reporters.
"If there were a new pandemic threat this year, next year, or the year after at least, we will be largely in the same place … maybe worse, given the tight fiscal space of many, if not most, countries right now."
Wednesday's report comes ahead of next week's World Health Assembly in Geneva, the WHO's annual decision-making forum, which is expected to address some of the issues raised.
While the body welcomed some steps forward, including moves to establish a separate global health security fund within the World Bank, it warned that global interest was waning and the years it will take to set up other instruments – including a potential pandemic treaty, an international agreement to improve preparedness – were too long. read more
The panel called for a high-level meeting at the U.N. General Assembly and independent health threats council led by heads-of-state to galvanise action.
"Only the highest-level political leadership has the legitimacy to bring multiple sectors together in this way," Sirleaf said in a statement.
Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Sign up to our health newsletter to keep up with the latest healthcare trends and pharmaceutical news.
Subscribe to our newsletter to get all the news you need to start your day.
Gilead Sciences Inc's Trodelvy extended by 1.5 months, or 34%, the length of time women with advanced stages of the most common type of breast cancer lived without their disease worsening, according to late-stage trial data presented on Saturday.
Reuters, the news and media division of Thomson Reuters, is the world’s largest multimedia news provider, reaching billions of people worldwide every day. Reuters provides business, financial, national and international news to professionals via desktop terminals, the world's media organizations, industry events and directly to consumers.
Build the strongest argument relying on authoritative content, attorney-editor expertise, and industry defining technology.
The most comprehensive solution to manage all your complex and ever-expanding tax and compliance needs.
The industry leader for online information for tax, accounting and finance professionals.
Access unmatched financial data, news and content in a highly-customised workflow experience on desktop, web and mobile.
Browse an unrivalled portfolio of real-time and historical market data and insights from worldwide sources and experts.
Screen for heightened risk individual and entities globally to help uncover hidden risks in business relationships and human networks.
All quotes delayed a minimum of 15 minutes. See here for a complete list of exchanges and delays.
© 2022 Reuters. All rights reserved

source

You might also like

Surviving 2nd wave of corona
COVID-19

Surviving The 2nd Wave of Corona

‘This too shall pass away’ this famous Persian adage seems to be defeating us again and again in the case of COVID-19. Despite every effort

@voguewellness